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Weekend Boating Forecast

Are you feeling spoilt? You should....

Last week was the extended Easter Break and this weekend is the Anzac Day Long Weekend. Plenty of time for boating activity, I hope! And for those lucky ones who are able to take off the few days in between, we're very, very jealous.

Be sure to watch this weekends boating forecast for your captain's briefing on where to go boating and what to do in these conditions. 

Our weekly report is proudly presented by St Kilda Boat Sales and our very own "The Boat-Guy" Darren Finkelstein for the waters of Port Phillip for the weekend of 25-27 April 2014.

ANZAC Day – 25 April – is probably Australia's most important national occasion. It marks the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War.

What does ANZAC stand for?

ANZAC stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. The soldiers in those forces quickly became known as Anzacs, and the pride they took in that name endures to this day.

Why is this day special to Australians?

When war broke out in 1914, Australia had been a federal commonwealth for only 13 years. The new national government was eager to establish its reputation among the nations of the world. In 1915 Australian and New Zealand soldiers formed part of the allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli peninsula in order to open the Dardanelles to the allied navies. The ultimate objective was to capture Constantinople (now Istanbul in Turkey), the capital of the Ottoman Empire, an ally of Germany.

The Australian and New Zealand forces landed on Gallipoli on 25 April, meeting fierce resistance from the Ottoman Turkish defenders. What had been planned as a bold stroke to knock Turkey out of the war quickly became a stalemate, and the campaign dragged on for eight months. At the end of 1915 the allied forces were evacuated, after both sides had suffered heavy casualties and endured great hardships. Over 8,000 Australian soldiers had been killed. News of the landing on Gallipoli had made a profound impact on Australians at home, and 25 April soon became the day on which Australians remembered the sacrifice of those who had died in the war.

Although the Gallipoli campaign failed in its military objectives, the Australian and New Zealand actions during the campaign left us all a powerful legacy. The creation of what became known as the “Anzac legend” became an important part of the identity of both nations, shaping the ways they viewed both their past and their future.

Darren is author of award winning and bestselling book; Honey, let’s buy a BOAT! Darren along with business partner Andrew Rose are the Dealer Principals of St Kilda Boat Sales and Service Centre. Andrew manages our service & repair centre and oversees our team of trained marine mechanics. Andrew and his team service and repair over 300 boats a year from our on-water workshop facility.

Enjoy our weekly boating forecast report
Safe Boating Always!

OFFICIAL WEATHER REPORT 
All weather information given by The Boat-Guy has been sourced directly from Bureau of Meteorology with good intentions, so blame them if it's wrong. Seriously, weather and boating forecasts do change and sometimes without notice. Always check the current forecast in full, before you go! 
Current 4-day Boating Forecast

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FishNet - Weekly Report for all  regions incl: Victoria & NSW
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Fish Victoria - Victoria's No 1 fishing website and forum
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Pictured below 
We love the season opener. Here's a ripper Snapper - location a secret.

Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre

Areas of Responsibility

NOAA's two Tsuami Warning Centers (PTWC and WC/ATWC) have separate areas of responsibility, which are the geographical areas within which each Center has the responsibility for the dissemination of messages and the provision of interpretive information to emergency managers and other officials, news media, and the public. These are shown on the map below.

Pacific - International

As the primarly operational headquarters for the Pacific Tsunami Warning System, PTWC provides warnings for Pacific basin teletsunamis (tsunamis that can cause damage far away from their source) to almost every country around the Pacific rim and to most of the Pacific island states. This function is carried out under the auspices of the UNESCO/IOC International Coordination Group for the Pacific Tsunami Warning System. A few destructive teletsunamis are generated each century by great earthquakes around the Pacific rim. Such tsunamis can propagate across the entire Pacific in less than 24 hours, and cause widespread destruction along shorelines located thousands of miles from the source. With ever-increasing population and development along most coastlines, there is a corresponding increase in risk. The last destructive teletsunami occurred in 1964 following the great Alaska earthquake.

Australia Region - current status
Pacific Ocean - current status
Indian Ocean - current status
Hawaii - current status